The Old Man Outwitted (original poem: John Murray - adapted Paul O’Brien)

 

Young Jeanie was handsome with eyes black as sloes

Good natured and kindly with skin white as snow;

But her father declared he would shoot the first man,

Who would dare to approach him and ask for her hand.

 

Now her father had wealth his position was grand,

He had sheep on the hills, he had horses and land;

And he loved his fair daughter as he loved his life,

But he swore while he lived she would ne’er be a wife.

 

But Jean loved a lad and was loved in return,

And often they met by a wee wimpling burn,

New pledges to make and old pledges renew,

And each vowed till death they would ever be true.

 

She long had been scheming to perfect a plan,

That would soften the heart o’ the cruel auld man,

She explained things to Geordie, and ere she was done

His heart had crept up most as high as his chin.

 

Then she painted her cheeks white as new driven snow,

And she sent for the doctor, her father and ma’,

The doctor arrived, shook his head with a sigh:

“Love has broken her young heart, of love she may die.”

 

For Jean loved a lad and was loved in return,

And often they met by a wee wimpling burn,

New pledges to make and old pledges renew,

And each vowed till death they would ever be true.

 

The auld man broke down and he cried like a wean:

“O’ Jeanie, my darling, speak your lover’s name,

And I won’t come between you, but I will rejoice

‘If you’re spared to get wed to the lad o’ your choice.

 

Then the white from her face quickly faded away,

And the red took its place ere the close o’ the day.

Now Jeannie and Geordie are joined hand and hand,

But they remember the trick played on the auld man.

 

For Jean loves a lad and is loved in return,

And still they do meet by that wee wimpling burn,

New pledges to make and old pledges renew,

For each vowed till death they would ever be true.